May 6, 2009

The Olympic Eleven

Filed under: Introduction — parto @ 4:00 am

Cheetah: This big cat is the world’s fastest sprinter, reaching speed of up to 110 kph in its pursuit of nippy prey. It can only sustain this for 200-300m for fear of terminally overheating.

Whale Shark:Its 1.5m wide maw and is designed solely for engulfing planktons. Big individuals may exceed 12m in length and weigh up to 15 tonnes.

Giraffe: Thia is the worlds tallest animal, with mature bulls reaching 5m or more. It also has the largest heart of terrestrial mammal, the extra pumping power helping to get the blood to distant extremities.

Ostrich:This is the world biggest bird (up to 2.5m tall) and the fastest runner on two legs ( up to 60 kph). It has the largest eyes of any land animal (up to 5cm across) and the world largest egg – which, at1.5kg, makes a decent omelette for 25 people.

Peregrine Falcon:It has a faster flying speed than any other creature. During its aerial stoop on prey (when it folds its wings and plumments downwards on an unsuspecting pigeon or water bird), it can exceed 180kph.

Goliath Beetle:Its a huge insect which is among the world’s heaviest, with the grubs of some species weighing more than a mouse.

Red Billed Quelea:This small member of the weaver family is the world’s most numerous bird, despite being confined in Africa. Flocks millions – strong, pulsing like giant shoals of fish, can strip a harvest in hours.

Gorilla:This massive animals already scales the podium as the world’s largest primate: mature silverback males may exceed 220kgs.

Goliath Frog:Africa largest frog is bigger than its smallest antelope. The goliath frog, confined to coastal rivers in Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea, can weigh up to a massive 3 kgs.

Sociable Weaver:A sparrow – like bird of the Kalahari, builds the world’s largest colonial nest. The immense twig – and grass structure may span more than 5m and contain individual apartments for over 100 pairs of weaver bird.

Egg – Eating Snake: The snake can swallow an egg three times the size of its own head

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